27-Mar-2018: Prof. Yesha Sivan featured speaker at ACCELERATE event in Tel Aviv

I’m participating as a speaker at ACCELERATE event for business and tech leaders in Tel Aviv talking about how to master the digital transformation.

Date: Tuesday,  27 March 2018
When: 09:00 – 13:30
Where: Hilton, Tel Aviv
How: Free (registration needed – save your seat)

My talk title:
Six digital-driven transformations as key drivers of the agile organization
Continue reading “27-Mar-2018: Prof. Yesha Sivan featured speaker at ACCELERATE event in Tel Aviv”

12..14-Sep-2017: Prof Yesha will participate at the Xin Forum in Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

The Tsinghua Xin Center will host its fourth annual Forum on September 13- 14, 2017.
This year’s theme focuses on health and sustainable development and explores the new approaches for the growth and challenges in the healthcare industry. The Forum has been a thriving platform to connect research institutions, enterprises, investors, high-tech incubators, and governments to achieve the ultimate goal of reforming the new business structure. Among the attendees expected are leaders of the Tsinghua University, TusPark Venture, officials from the Embassy of Israel, a delegation of TAU teachers and students, and Israeli entrepreneurs.
In addition, a TAU day will be held at the Beijing Institute of Technology on September 12, 2017.
The Coller Institute of Venture will be represented by Prof. Yesha Sivan, who is scheduled to speak on both the BIT-TAU day and the XIN Forum.
Click here to view additional information about the forum and apply for participation.
Originally posted on CIV.

20-Feb-2017: Prof. Sivan chairs VC’s/Dealmakers panel at Silicon Dragon event in Tel Aviv

Silicon Dragon forum at Tel Aviv Stock Exchange – CIV’s executive director Prof. Yesha Sivan is moderating a VC’s/Dealmakers panel. Panelists are: Avishai Silvershatz, Infinity Capital; Lior Simon, Arbor Ventures; Dan Clivner, Sidley; Yonatan Machao, JVP, Yoav Chelouche, Aviv Venture; Jeffrey Chi, Vickers Ventures, Yesha Sivan, Coller Institute of Venture with Rebecca Fannin, Silicon Dragon.

Israeli and Chinese venture capitalists, investors and entrepreneurs met on February 20th, 2017 at the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange for the Silicon Dragon Forum, to discuss the China-Israel-US tech triangle and the increasing role of VCs in the Chinese innovation ecosystem. Among the panelists attending and speaking at the forum were representatives of prominent VCs and angels, corporates (Baidu and IBM), and dealmakers.

https://youtu.be/C8hJSZgD_ZA

26-Jan-2017: Prof. Sivan to Deliver a Keynote at IPEM 2017

IPEM 2017

26-Jan-2017 at 9:30am @ Palais des Festivals, Cannes, France

Structured as a marketplace to foster business opportunities between private and institutional investors, investment funds, service providers and business owners seeking to support their company’s development, the International Private Equity Market (IPEM) is the worlds’ biggest Private Equity tradeshow to gather the whole value chain of the PE Industry. This year, IPEM will take place at the Palais des Festivals in Cannes (France), between January 25-27, 2017.

Interview

Prof. Yesha Sivan, CIV Executive Director, will deliver a keynote on tech investments at the Entrepreneurs forum of IPEM, discussing recent trends in tech investments, investment opportunities, and learnings from the Israeli tech miracle. The talk will take place on Thursday, January 26 at 9:30am.

IPEM is the only Private Equity market in Europe, and the second largest PE-Event in Europe, with 1200 participants from 35 countries. This year’s program will focus on technology, with panels and leading companies represented from the fields of FinTech, FoodTech and Big Data.

If you would like to explore CIV and learn more about our activities – meet Yesha at IPEM.

Jerusalem Post article: about De-know-polization by Prof. Yesha Sivan

Let us begin with a fundamental observation of the “de-monopolization” of knowledge, a.k.a. “de-know-polization.” Until the end of the 20th century, universities were the societal leaders in the creation, transfer and usage of knowledge. Today, however, this historical role is fundamentally changing.

Most universities are no longer the best place to do research and teach. Their societal service as hubs of knowledge and innovation can be done more effectively elsewhere. What used to be their natural monopoly is currently under attack.

De-know-polization is both a cause for and a response to the disruption of this old monopoly, rising from globalization and digitization. As de-know-polization reveals itself, university leaders will need to take actions, and justify these actions to their public and private funders, including students paying tuition and taxpayers.

Taxpayers will ask how does university research affect our quality of life? Why do we need to fund professors’ travel and publishing papers that have little relevance to our society? On the other hand, students, their parents, and other funders of education will ask where is the best place to learn? Who gives the best value for the investment?

Where is the best place to do research in computer science? The answer is probably Google, Facebook, Microsoft or IBM. The livelihood of such firms depends on new products and services that stem from their research. Their researchers do not have to teach; they usually have the needed resources of time, money and equipment – and they have business managers that push for value. Private firms, or dedicated research organizations, seem like a better answer than the usual university faculty-driven research or labs.

Most university teaching is akin to horses in the ages of cars. An extra-terrestrial observer will wonder why we keep putting people into the same lackluster context of ineffectiveness potentially causing torture by boredom. The classical model of several students listening to a lecture in the same room is tired, often resulting in only a quarter of students listening, a quarter spending their time on Facebook or Tinder, a quarter sleeping or dreaming based on the previous apps, and the rest are not even in class. Online education, including massive open online courses, is but a small step in the right direction.

Universities that will continue with “older” teaching methods and not embrace the new tools will not be able to justify their funding.

Moreover, assuming that we need to fund teaching – shouldn’t we fund it in the best place possible? Could not-for-profits provide a better social service than researchers that also need to teach? Why invest in a ‘jack of all trades’ rather than a ‘master of one’?

What about societal service? We cannot anymore justify the public investment in universities in the age of globalization and digitization. Capital and people are flowing to the best place for their goals. There is much less reason to be near a university anymore, and funding a university with the hope of getting good jobs and firms only diverts resources from other, more effective policy actions – like lower tax with direct impact on business, or enhancing quality of life, itself a pull for economic growth.

Our message to university leaders and policy-makers, further elaborated in the recent issue of Coller Venture Review is to be aware of the various threats and opportunities, particularly when it comes to the evolving role of universities within the evolving venture ecosystem. Don’t think business is as usual – seek new models for research, teaching and service. A plan of no action will lead to an inevitable demise. Business as usual now means no business at all in the future. Better you lead the change, than let the change lead you.

Prof. Yesha Sivan is an Executive Director, Coller Institute of Venture, Tel Aviv University. Coller Institute is a member of IATI (Israel Advanced Technology Industries)